Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything Review

Tasha's Cauldron of Everything - Wizards of the Coast - $50
tcover

Game title: Tasha's Cauldron of Everything

Game description: The wizard Tasha, whose great works include the spell Tasha’s hideous laughter, has gathered bits and bobs of precious lore during her illustrious career as an adventurer. Her enemies wouldn’t want these treasured secrets scattered across the multiverse, so in defiance, she has collected and codified these tidbits for the enrichment of all.

Overall
4
  • Play (Mechanics)
  • Presentation (Art/Quality)
  • Plan (Rules)

Summary

The latest big rules drop since Xanathar’s Guide to Everything, Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything collects some pre-existing rules scattered throughout other sources with a plethora of new rules for Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edtion. Some of the biggest items include the return of Psionics, group patrons, magical tattoos, and a stack of puzzles to scramble players’ minds.

Pros

  • Puzzles
  • Psionics
  • Magic tattoos
  • Amazing alt cover

Cons

  • A hefty price tag for a smaller book
  • Alt cover, while beautiful, doesn’t match other alt covers when placed on the shelf.

Full Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything Review

The latest big rules drop since Xanathar’s Guide to Everything, Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything collects some pre-existing rules scattered throughout other sources with a plethora of new rules for Dungeons & Dragons 5th Edtion. Some of the biggest items include the return of Psionics, group patrons, magical tattoos, and a stack of puzzles to scramble players’ minds.

To say I’ve been eagerly awaiting Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything is an understatement. Stuffed with over 20 new subclasses, including some previously unofficial ones like the Rune Knight, new spells, new ways to customize characters, and a slew of DM tools, Tasha’s may surpass Xanathar’s in terms of quality content. As soon as it was announced, I knew that this volume was going to be a “must-have.”

99202c4a 24df 41d3 88c0 f3fa378cedb4 spell mind sliver
Psionics are back, baby!

Tasha’s opens with rules on tweaking your character upon creation, as well as rules for changing your subclass mid-game. Right after that, you’ve got the Artificer, for those who didn’t have any interest in picking up Eberron: Rising from the Last War. Each class gets option features that can be implemented when creating a character as well as several new subclasses. A few of these subclasses, like the Psi Warrior or Soulknight, are psionic-based. Honestly, there’s a ton of good stuff in here, making choices during character creation so much harder.

Group patrons are another item we’ve seen before in Eberron, though there are expanded options in Tasha’s. They’re the least interesting part of the book, though I can see the appeal for some. The new spells and artifacts that come after are particularly exciting, especially the new cantrips. Magical tattoos come in literally all shapes and sizes, providing a spectrum of buffs if players can afford them.

The 2nd half of the book deals with the sidekick rules first seen in the Essentials Kit, DM tools like having a session zero and safety tools similar to lines & veils, and a chapter on puzzles. Things to toss into a game like Mimic Colonies surely bring a smile to one’s face. Puzzles sorted by difficulty, which include everything you need to incorporate them, are something D&D has needed in an official capactiy for some time.

There’s really not much to dislike about Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything. That is, unless you look at the price. Yes, it’s a concentration of excellent content, but ti’s also one of the smallest books Wizards has put out in a while. It’s time they look into a scaled pricing model to make the books’ appeal a bit more enticing. Eberron and Rime of the Frostmaiden are large books. Why should Tasha’s cost the same as them?

Tasha Books
The standard and alt covers

Finally, as with most books release, Tasha’s has an amazing alt cover you can get by purchasing the book from your friendly local game store. I know I say this a lot, but it may be one of their best yet. The downside? The spine isn’t black, making it stick out a bit from the mostly uniform alt covers released to date. It’s by no means a deal-breaker, but it may drive some collectors mad.

If you’re a 5e player, you need this book. There is just too much cool stuff in it to pass by. Sure, a bit of it is rehashed material, but it’s great to have that included in a “core” book.

A copy of Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything was provided free for review by Wizards of the Coast

Liked it? Take a second to support us on Patreon!
become a patron button

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.