Streets of Steel Review

Streets of Steel - Wild Power Games
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Game title: Streets of Steel

Game description: STREETS OF STEEL is a 1-4 player co-operative side-scrolling boardgame, where players brawl their way through baddies in a 1980's-esque, pixelated, post-apocalyptic, degenerate cityscape. Fight filthy PUNX, hot-headed FIREBUGS, and elusive KILLGAROOS (yup, ninja kangaroos) in order to take down the big BOSS MUTIE.

Overall
3.7
  • Play (Mechanics)
  • Presentation (Art/Quality)
  • Plan (Rules)

Summary

STREETS OF STEEL is a 1-4 player co-operative side-scrolling boardgame, where players brawl their way through baddies in a 1980’s-esque, pixelated, post-apocalyptic, degenerate cityscape. Fight filthy PUNX, hot-headed FIREBUGS, and elusive KILLGAROOS (yup, ninja kangaroos) in order to take down the big BOSS MUTIE.

Pros

  • Nostalgic, 16-bit beat’em up
  • Thematic mechanics
  • Mayor Van Dammage

Cons

  • Rules need a bit of work to be more clear

Full Streets of Steel Review

Fans of Final Fight, rejoice! Wild Power Games brings the nostalgic feeling of old-school, 16-bit beat’em ups to the table with Streets of Steel. Players take control of Mayor Van Dammage, Average Joe, Kiki, and Candy Connor as they fight their way through Punx, Firebugs, and Killgaroos before confronting the Mutie Boss. Time for some street politics. The kind that involves a flurry of knuckles and swift feet. Maybe even a lead pipe or two.

I’ve already written a Streets of Steel preview when it hit Kickstarter back in May of 2018. Not much significant has changed since then. Just some polished bits, final artwork, and some really nice miniatures (an optional purchase.) The finished product is really nicely made, the box even having space inside to fit the extra minis and the trays they come in. All the artwork looks fantastic, and the cardboard bits are nice and chunky, with a sturdy, long-lasting feel.

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All the final bits, including the optional minis

The gameplay has remained pretty much the same since I last looked at the game. Each round, the heroes and villains will alternate turns, the villains using a behavior deck to determine how they act. Players can move, attack, build up special tokens, and unleash special attacks. Certain crates on the street will also contain useful items to help you along the way. At the end of the round, the leftmost street tile will be discarded, along with anything and anyone on it, and a new one will be placed to the right. You never want to get caught with your pants down on that tile.

Streets of Steel continues in this manner until you reach the last street tile, the one that contains the Mutie Boss. Beat him, and you win the game. If all your heroes die and there are no quarters left to bring them back, you lose. You can even scale the difficulty of the game by starting with more or fewer quarters.

It’s a lot of fun and really does capture the feeling of a side-scrolling brawler really well. The game is also made in a way where you can expand upon it by buying other sets in the series. Each Street of Steel game is considered “expandalone,” meaning each set stands on its own yet is made to expand upon other sets available. As of right now, there are two sets, Kickin’ Asphalt and Rush ‘N Scare.

I’ve been playing Kickin’ Asphalt and really having a blast with it, so I’m sure Rush ‘N Scare is in my future at some point. While vague and in need of some work in a few places, the rules are simple enough, and the gameplay is fairly quick. It took around 45 minutes the first time we sat down to play, and now we can get a full game in, on the easiest setting, in a little over 30 minutes.

So far, Wild Power Games hasn’t done me wrong. High Heavens is a fantastic game, as is Streets of Steel. Their support of their titles is top-notch as well, and I can’t wait to see what the future holds for their latest title. Until then, Mayor Van Dammage and I will perform our ballad on the streets until they’re cleansed of Mutie Boss and his Punx.

A copy of Streets of Steel: Kickin’ Asphalt was provided free for review by Wild Power Games

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