Slide Quest Review

Tim & Kayleigh Mierzejewski review, tabletop Leave a Comment

Slide Quest - Blue Orange Games - $ 27.99

Game title: Slide Quest

Game description: With easy-to-digest rules, an immediate toyish quality, and exciting, rewarding gameplay, this is an easy recommendation for a family of 2 to 4 people who like playing together!

Overall
4.7
  • Play (Mechanics)
  • Presentation (Art/Quality)
  • Plan (Rules)

Summary

With easy-to-digest rules, an immediate toyish quality, and exciting, rewarding gameplay, this is an easy recommendation for a family of 2 to 4 people who like playing together!

Pros

  • Extremely intuitive play
  • Instant gratification – you know exactly what you’re doing right (or wrong)
  • Truly cooperative

Cons

  • Requires complete cooperation – one uncooperative kid will ruin it for everyone
  • Possibly limited replay (only 4 “quests” of 5 boards each)

I recently got the chance to play the introductory quest of Slide Quest with my 5 year old daughter – check out this review/interview to see how she liked it! (Some of my thoughts are below the video, in boring old text form.)

Slide Quest is an ingeniously simple game. You roll a knight around a board, maneuvering around obstacles and enemies, to reach a goal. Each board has at least one trap – a hole that the knight can fall into. Some boards have extra enemies that have to be pushed into traps, and some have dynamite that has to be kept standing and not pushed into traps. If you make it through a certain number of boards without losing too many lives (falling into traps, not dealing with enemies, exploding dynamite), then you win the quest!

My daughter and I about to embark on the second part of the quest. The knight needs to follow the light path around the dynamite, around the fences and boulders, and to the “3” signpost.

Each player controls one or two levers that tilts the whole board, moving the marble-bottomed knight around. The players have to work together to communicate their moves and intentions. It is highly cooperative – there’s no room for a lone wolf, or for someone trying to control everything. A parent can certainly coach their kid, but they can’t take their actions for them. Everything is real time, but players can pause the action for as long as they need to formulate a plan. This makes for great parent-child play. In addition, in a 3-player game, one player controls 2 levers while the other two players control 1 each; this could be a good opportunity for a parent to help the kids as well.

The box says it’s for ages 7+, which seems about right. I played with my 5-year-old who can handle games a bit above her age range, and it was doable for her but certainly not a cakewalk. Her little sister, age 3 but able to handle some older-kid games as well, just hit the levers at random, which makes the game literally impossible. There is no reading required; the only skills needed are communication, pressing levers and matching numbers.

We just lost our last life near the end of the last board of our quest!

Players can adjust the difficulty by modifying the number of lives they have to work with. On our first time through, we played at the easiest printed difficulty on the introductory quest (a quest is a set of 5 boards played one after another; the game comes with four such quests plus rules for making one epic quest with all 20 boards). And we came pretty close to winning! Players could just as well ignore the lives system altogether and just keep playing until the knight reaches the end of the quest.

With easy-to-digest rules, an immediate toyish quality, and exciting, rewarding gameplay, this is an easy recommendation for a family of 2 to 4 people who like playing together!

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