Sentinels of the Multiverse Review

Sentinels of the Multiverse - Greater Than Games - $40
SOTM Core box

Game title: Sentinels of the Multiverse

Game description: Sentinels of the Multiverse is a cooperative card game of superheroics with fully-constructed decks for each hero. With multiple villains and locations for crime-fighting, plus variant play modes for going up against villain teams, controlling teams of heroes instead of individuals, and defeating villains on multiple battlefronts, the game has a lot of replayability.

Overall
3.7
  • Play (Mechanics)
  • Presentation (Art/Quality)
  • Plan (Rules)

Summary

Sentinels of the Multiverse is a cooperative card game of superheroics with fully-constructed decks for each hero. With multiple villains and locations for crime-fighting, plus variant play modes for going up against villain teams, controlling teams of heroes instead of individuals, and defeating villains on multiple battlefronts, the game has a lot of replayability.

Pros

  • Replayabilty? Oh, yes.
  • Just grab a few decks and you’re ready to play
  • Expansions add a lot

Cons

  • Art style is rough and uneven
  • Fiddly math at times
  • No customizing of heroes*

To begin with, Sentinels of the Multiverse is a nice package in the base game set. Grab three to five of the ten heroes in the box, one of the four villains, and one of the environments and you’re set to go. (Initially it’s best to play with at least three players – two players can each control two heroes, or one player can control three.) The various heroes have different play styles: Legacy, a Superman analog, is a hero that primarily supports and buffs other heroes while still being a force to be reckoned with on the battlefield; Tachyon, our game’s Flash, sets herself up for a devastating blow; and Wraith (read: Batman) cycles through her gear to be ready for battle. Each of the villains has different strategies to victory and each of the environments throws different challenges and twists to the fight. Playing Legacy, Tachyon, and Wraith going up against Citizen Dawn in Megalopolis will be quite different than pitting those same heroes against Omnitron on Insula Primalis. The villain decks are little engines that the game plays against your team – it is truly a cooperative game, not a one vs many game.

The game’s replayability opens up quite a bit with the expansions. While some simply add more heroes, villains, and environments to the mix, The Villains of the Multiverse and the Vengeance expansions add on villainous teams to bring to justice instead of a single supervillain; Oblivaeon features a major comic book crossover event à la Avengers: Infinity War and Endgame with multiple battlefronts and a reality-ending archvillain.

Sentinels of the Multiverse components.

Buy into the series and you’ve got a lot of game to play – my personal collection has thirty-two heroes, twenty-two environments, twenty-six individual villains, plus fifteen villains that are suitable for villain team play, plus everything in the Oblivaeon box which I still haven’t been able to play because there’s just so much game in combining heroes, villains, and environments… Oh, and did I mention the variant hero cards that change your hero’s basic power? (That’s really the only customization of the heroes that you can do, and those are a separate product.)

But the game also has a bit of math involved as various buffs and debuffs are applied to heroes and villains alike, the calculations of which can slow game play down. The artwork is quite hit or miss. (The kindest way to put it is to say that Adam Rebottaro’s artwork has definitely improved as the seven or so years the line has been active.) The graphic design of the cards has also gotten better over the course of the line, but with the trade dress established, the names of the cards are difficult to read and the text of the cards are cramped (and could have been done with a cleaner comic book typeface).

Overall, I enjoy the game and recommend picking up the base game to try out. If the $40 price tag is a bit much to try out, Greater Than Games has the game on sale for $29.96. Or, the digital version has a try it for free option with the base game ranging from $3 to $10, dependent on platform (PC, Linux, and Apple and Android platforms).

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