Godsforge Review

Godsforge -Atlas Games - $34.95

Game title: Godsforge

Game description: In Godsforge, you are an elite spellcaster. You roll, re-roll, group, and combine dice whose results channel the crucial elements you need to summon creations and cast sorceries from your cards.

Overall
3.2
  • Play (Mechanics)
  • Presentation (Art/Quality)
  • Plan (Rules)

Summary

The Yahtzee Roll gets another spell-slinging game with Atlas Games’ Godsforge, a combat game between elite spell casters. Players roll dice to determine which card they can play from their hand, then simultaneously cast their card, deal damage to the player on their left, and protect themselves from the player to their right. Etherium and Veilstones help manipulate die rolls, while Godstones are used to cast the most potent spells.

Pros

  • Visually stunning
  • Fast, simultaneous play
  • Familiar mechanics

Cons

  • A bit too chaotic
  • Needs more variety

Full Godsforge Review

The Yahtzee Roll gets another spell-slinging game with Atlas Games’ Godsforge, a combat game between elite spell casters. Players roll dice to determine which card they can play from their hand, then simultaneously cast their card, deal damage to the player on their left, and protect themselves from the player to their right. Etherium and Veilstones help manipulate die rolls, while Godstones are used to cast the most potent spells.

Godforge’s rulebook may confuse you at first with it’s talk of different elements and what numbers of the dice correspond to them, but the game isn’t quite as complicated as all that. Each card has specific requirements that need to be met to cast. Some need specific numbers, runs, or combined dice to get values over 6. Some need Veilstones, gems that can be earned by rolling a 1 or 6. 1’s are also wild. There are two types of cards to cast: Creation and Spells. Creations stay on the table, while Spells are single use effects.

Godsforge Review - Sample Cards
Sample Creation cards

Each card will have an attack value, defense value, a special effect, or any combination of the previous. Players cast a single card, if able, on their turn simultaneously and deal/protect against damage from other players. It’s fast-paced, a little chaotic, and quite fun. The game isn’t quite as deep as it could be, with very few interactions between cards, but this is something that can certainly be fixed with expansions.

There are certainly some interesting design choices in Godsforge. To keep the game quick, additional damage is taken by each player once the first player (in a 3+ player game) is knocked out. Certain cards can have their power boosted by pumping Veilstones into them. It’s also quite possible that two or more players can kill each other simultaneously. If this causes the game to end, the player who’s life is closest to 0 (players can drop into the negatives) wins, having the most remains left to be sent to their family.

Game in progress
A game in progress

There’s certainly a lot to like about Godsforge. The core mechanics and the artwork both being well executed. There’s a few things that cause the game to fall a bit short. The previously mentioned lack of depth, along with a poorly written rule book being the two main offenders. It’s a game that shows much promise with future releases, if it actually sees any.

A copy of Godsforge was provided free for review by Atlas Games

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