Dragon Petz Review - Header

Dragon Petz Review

Rob Kalajian review, tabletop Leave a Comment

Dragon Petz - Japanime Games $24.95
Dragon Petz Review - Cover

Game title: Dragon Petz

Game description: A game of dragon breeding for 2 to 4 players. Welcome to the 1783rd annual Dragon Breeding Competition! Using a pool of dice you must share with the other breeders, send your Dragon Seekers out into the Forest to catch the most rare and wondrous dragons—and find suitable mates! But be careful: time can run out quickly, and unpaired dragons will inflict a steep penalty! Gather the most valuable breeding pairs and claim your rightful title as the Supreme Dragon Breeder in this game from the creators of Dungeon Bazar and Guilds.

Overall
3.3
  • Play (Mechanics)
  • Presentation (Art/Quality)
  • Plan (Rules)

Summary

The 1783rd annual dragon breeding competition is about to begin and it’s up to you to send your Dragon Seekers into the woods to find the best mates for your dragons. Dragon Petz starts you off with 2 dragons to start off the competition, but you’re on your own from there! Collect dragons, breed pairs, profit! The player with the most coins at the end of the game wins. I only have one question…how long does the dragon breeding competition last? Babies don’t just pop out instantly…

Pros

Cute dragons Dice passing mechanic works well Great for the whole family

Cons

Setup is slightly confusing the first time Rulebook could be more clear in some instances

Full Dragon Petz Review

The 1783rd annual dragon breeding competition is about to begin and it’s up to you to send your Dragon Seekers into the woods to find the best mates for your dragons. Dragon Petz starts you off with 2 dragons to start off the competition, but you’re on your own from there! Collect dragons, breed pairs, profit! The player with the most coins at the end of the game wins.

I only have one question…how long does the dragon breeding competition last? Babies don’t just pop out instantly…

Dragon Petz starts with each player getting 2 dragons randomly with duplicate dragons being returned and new ones are drawn. They also get one of each colored disc. The appropriate amount of egg cards, depending on the number of players, is added and shuffled into the dragon tile deck. A 4×4 grid of face-up dragons is created and colored wooden discs are placed along the end of the grid, again determined by the number of players. All 5 dice are rolled, and play begins.

Getting male and female dragons of the same color is the name of the game here. This is done by choosing a colored die and placing Seekers on a dragon in a matching colored row or column, using the number on the die to determine how deep to go. Players can also play coins to re-roll the dice, collect dragons that their Seekers are on, or to refill the forest with more dragons. If a player gets a breeding pair of dragons they score the value of the higher card in the pair in coins. The game immediately ends when the draw deck is empty.

Dragon Petz is a fairly simple game, but there’s a few mechanics in there that step it up a notch. One of my favorites is the shared dice pool. As stated before, at the start of the game all 5 dice are rolled and during a player’s turn they choose one. That means the rest of the players have to choose from what’s left each time their turn comes around, unless they pay a coin to re-roll the dice. Sometimes the dice work in the players’ favor. Sometimes a lot of coins are spent as players try to grab choice dragons.

Cuteness overload
(Photo credit: Cathy Bock)

Collecting dragons is also interesting, as there’s a bit of push-your-luck element. On your turn, you can pay a coin to collect any dragons your Seekers on are. If you do this, all the other players can collect their dragons for free. Why not wait for another player to pay so you can get all your dragons for free? Well, players can knock Seekers off dragons to claim them for their own. Sometimes you need to get when the gettin’s good.

There’s a few snags here and there with the game. The rule book, while wonderfully illustrated and laid out, is a bit vague is some places. This makes setting up the game a bit confusing your first time. Dragon Petz is easy enough, however, that you’ll easily get the hang of the game and not really need the rules after that.

As far as family games go, Dragon Petz is certainly a good one. The cute dragons definitely bump it up a notch, whereas without them the game might be a bit less memorable. The mechanics are sound, but I feel other family worker placement-type games would overshadow this. As is stands, Dragon Petz is super cute, which helps it hit the table more.

A copy of Dragon Petz was provided free for review by Japanime Games

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