AfterShock: A Tavern Game - Cover

AfterShock: A Tavern Game Review

Rob Kalajian review, tabletop Leave a Comment

AfterShock: A Tavern Game - AFK Games - $19.99
AfterShock: A Tavern Game - Cover

Game title: AfterShock: A Tavern Game

Game description: Welcome to the AfterShock Tavern! I am so happy you found your way to our little corner of the world. You look like a discerning traveler. We have two card games to choose from: FuddleDich is a 2 to 6 player trick-taking strategy card game that uses terrain features as suits with special trump cards that can change the active terrain at any time. Any card can win but you must know the right time to play it. Can you best your family and friends by collecting 100 cards first? Cartographer is a solitaire puzzle game where you create and remove clusters of matching terrain in a bid to create the perfect map! It's not as easy as it sounds because you'll never build the same map twice. AfterShock landscape cards can also take your favorite tabletop role-playing game to the next level. Have your group participate in creating outdoor maps or add it as a tavern game for weary travelers to blow off steam.

Overall
2.3
  • Play (Mechanics)
  • Presentation (Art/Quality)
  • Plan (Rules)

Summary

Aftershock is 2 games in 1 using a 60-card set of hexagonal terrain tiles. The game is meant to be simple and portable. Something you’d play at a tavern over drinks and a fine meal after a long day of adventuring. The tiles can also be used for Worldbuilding in an RPG setting. Are you ready for some rounds of Fuddledich with friends? Maybe a quiet game of Cartographer while you drink alone? Perhaps a game of your own invention lies within the deck of Aftershock.

Pros

Interesting concept

Can be used for Worldbuilding

Cons

Card values are not intuitive

Priced high for what you get

Full AfterShock: A Tavern Game Review

Aftershock is 2 games in 1 using a 60-card set of hexagonal terrain tiles. The game is meant to be simple and portable. Something you’d play at a tavern over drinks and a fine meal after a long day of adventuring. The tiles can also be used for Worldbuilding in an RPG setting. Are you ready for some rounds of Fuddledich with friends? Maybe a quiet game of Cartographer while you drink alone? Perhaps a game of your own invention lies within the deck of Aftershock.

Aftershock is comprised of 60 cards with varying configurations of 4 terrain types: Grass, Mountain, Water, and Forest. Single Terrain Cards count as 6 of that type of terrain. Double Terrain Cards contains Grass and one of the the other types, counting as the number of corners the other type occupies. Triple Terrain Cards count as all 3 types of terrain on them in the values of how many corners they take up.

The first game included with Aftershock is Fuddledich, a simple trick-taking game that’s played to 100 points. Each player starts with cards and the Lead player places a card to determine the Lead Terrain. Other players must follow suit and the player with the highest value of the Lead Terrain wins the trick. Players can change the Lead Terrain with a Triple Terrain card or a Single Grass Terrain. The game is played to 100 points.

AfterShock: A Tavern Game Review - Deck
Aftershock tiles

Cartographer is a single player puzzle game where players are trying to create a single landmass while scoring 60 points. This is done by placing tiles and removing clusters to score them. It’s a bit confusing at first, but becomes second nature once you get the hang of it.

Both games are fairly simplistic yet Aftershock earns points for having an interesting concept of being played with terrain. It’s use in world building exercises is also novel. Unfortunately it suffers from card values not being instantly being recognizable due to the lack of any text or iconography on them. It’s also quite expensive, coming in at $20 for a deck of 60 tiles.

I’m torn with this one. The tiles are pretty cool, but the games are just too simplistic to justify the price. There are much better trick taking games and solo cards games out there. The ability to come up with a quick landmass using Aftershock tiles is pretty cool, though. Honestly, I’d probably have a better opinion of the game if it were $10 cheaper.

A copy of AfterShock: A Tavern Game was provided free for review by AFK Games

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