Supertall Review - Header

Supertall Review

Rob Kalajian review, tabletop Leave a Comment

Supertall - Button Shy Games $10

Game title: Supertall

Game description: In the heart of the city, steel beams race skyward. While other cities sprawl endlessly outwards, these city planners are looking up - up - UP! Real estate prices are skyrocketing, and it’s time for a new class of skyscraper, the “Supertall”, to reshape the skyline.

Overall
3.3
  • Play (Mechanics)
  • Presentation (Art/Graphic Design/Quality)
  • Plan (Rules)

Summary

Button Shy Games is known for their wallet series of microgames and has earned a reputation for making quality games with around 18 cards each. Supertall is no exception to this rule. It’s a game for 2-3 players where players are trying to create the tallest, highest scoring towers by building floors, using abilities, or scrapping cards.

Pros

Small footprint

Easy to learn/play

Cute design

Cons

Suffer from a bit of Analysis Paralysis

Expansion content feels like it should have been part of the full game

Button Shy Games is known for their wallet series of microgames and has earned a reputation for making quality games with around 18 cards each. Supertall is no exception to this rule. It’s a game for 2-3 players where players are trying to create the tallest, highest scoring towers by building floors, using abilities, or scrapping cards.

At the start of each game, the cards are shuffled, one card is placed in the center of the table as City Hall, each player gets 1 card to start their first tower, and the rest of the cards are placed into 3 equal draw piles. Each turn a player will draw from one of the 3 piles and either:

  • Add it to a building spot
  • Use the card’s ability and then place it back on the bottom of a draw pile still containing cards
  • Scrap the card and place it on the City Hall pile
Supertall Review - Setup

3-player Supertall setup

Each card has a tax assessment value, floor type, and ability. To add a card to a building its tax assessment value must be greater than or equal to the last card on a tower. The floor type dictates scoring at the end of the game. Whatever floor type is on the top of a building at the end of the game determines the building type and how it will earn points. Card abilities allow you to move cards around your buildings in different ways. City Hall, while seemingly not very important at first plays a pretty big role in the end. When it comes time to score buildings, no building that matches the type of the top City Hall card will score. Bummer.

Supertall is a pretty awesome game for such a small package. The dynamics between floor types, City Hall, card and card abilities make for some interesting and tough choices during play. In fact, it can suffer from some Analysis Paralysis at times as players take the time to try and figure out the best way to use the card drawn. There’s also a small expansion that adds a new floor type and allows for 4 players which really feels like it should have been part of the base game to begin with.

The game is $10 to preorder from Button Shy Games, a great value. Once preorders end the game will go up to $12, which is still pretty damn good. If you’re looking for a thinky little game in an even smaller package, Supertall may be for you.

A copy of Supertall was purchased for this review

 

Media personality Rob Kalajian has been a staple in the board game world for many years. As a former writer for Purple Pawn and the owner of A Pawn’s Perspective, Rob focuses on board game reviews, events, and news. A self-proclaimed geek, Rob loves all things toys and games and even helps raise his four kids in his spare time.

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