Review – No Regerts: The Game of Art and Poor Life Choices

Rob Kalajian review, tabletop 0 Comments

Designers: David Petrie
Publisher: Poisonfish Games
Year: 2017
MSRP: $24.99
Players: 2-6
Play Time: 25 minutes
Ages: 8+
Rules Available Online: Video
BGG: No Regerts: The Game of Art and Poor Life Choices

Prelude

There’s nothing like the feeling of a getting a new tattoo. There’s excitement, a little anxiety, some pain, then the payoff of seeing your new ink in the flesh. Literally. The best part? Showing off your new badass body art to everyone who’s willing to look.

Until you find it it may not be as badass as you thought. It’s quite possibly totally lame.

Oh, well. No Regerts. It’s yours now. Unless you can afford to get laser removal…or you severe a limb and swap it with someone else’s that has way cooler tattoos.

Sound extreme? It’s just a typical game of No Regerts: The Game of Art and Poor Life Choices.

Play

The goal of No Regerts is to be the most badass at the end of the game. You become more badass by filling your arms, legs, chest, and back with awesome tattoos to rack up major points. You need to be careful, though. Some tattoos are way lame and will score negative points. Even worse? Other players can influence your tattoo choices and force some pretty bogus ink onto your precious free space.

At the start of the game, everyone gets a placement card. It’s a reminder of what parts of your body are available to play cards on. Each part of your body can hold 3 tattoos before it’s “closed” and cannot be played to anymore. Once everyone has a placement card the deck is shuffled and all players get 5 cards.

Each player’s turn goes a little something like this:

  • Get a tattoo (mandatory) – You *must* get a tattoo to start your turn. Positive tattoos must be paid for by discarding another positive-value tattoo. The values don’t need to match. Negative tattoos are free. You can only start a tattoo on one part of your body and if you can’t, or don’t want to, you must discard two cards and end your turn, drawing back up to 5.
  • Play modifiers or get more tattoos (optional) – Once you’ve gotten your mandatory tattoo you can play as many modifiers as you want, or get more tattoos (if you can pay for them.) You can only place new tattoos on open body parts that already have at least one tattoo on them. The only restriction of this phase is that you must have at least one card in your hand at the end.
  • Resolve card text (mandatory) – Some cards have abilities on them. Abilities resolve on whichever player a tattoo is played on.
  • Discard (mandatory) – Discard one card.
  • Draw (mandatory) – Draw back up to 5 cards.

Play continues until one person has closed off all parts of their body by filling each with 3 tattoos. This player gets a bonus, then scores are totaled and a winner is chosen.

Pieces

No Regerts comes in a thick, double card-sized box. The cards are a good stock are filled with badass artwork from Samantha  Petrie. Even the lame tattoos look pretty cool. I’m actually a bit upset that “I ♥ Tacos” is considered lame. It’s pretty damn sweet. I mean, come on, tacos are the best.

Perspective

No Regerts has a lot going for it. It’s fairly easy to learn with a light set of rules but actually, has a fair about of options and chances for player interaction. Card abilities add to this, as sometimes negative valued tattoos have abilities that can actually help you out. The choice is whether or not the tradeoff is worth it. There are also times when you might want to play a negative tattoo on someone else, but the ability on that card might give them an edge. Do you still slap that nasty ink on them in hopes the ability doesn’t come back to bite you in the butt? You can also play cards that can turn a negative tattoo into a positive one, or vise versa.

There’s also the meta story that emerges every time you play. Make a bad decision with that cross-eyed Jesus tattoo? That’s ok. It’s gone with laser removal. Wait a minute. Did you just get another cross-eyed Jesus tattoo…in the same space? You most certainly did if another player used a Bad Decision card to play it back on you. You remember when you went into the shop to get that ultra-sweet dragon tattoo? A shame it was drawn poorly. Now you look pretty lame.

No Regerts: The Game of Art and Poor Life Choices is a really fun game, especially with the max numbers of players. It’s a bit strategic, a bit chaotic, and a lot of laughs. Lovers of tattoos will get a kick out of it, though I’m not sure how they’d feel if they’ve got any of the tattoos that the game considers lame. At $24.99 you’ll certainly get your moneys worth of plays out of this one.

A copy of No Regerts was provided free for review by Poisonfish Games

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Father of 4. Husband to 1. Overall Geek. Rob is the owner of A Pawn’s Perspective. During the day he’s a Senior Web Developer for an ad agency in Avon, CT. In his free time…he has no free time. Games. Toys. Books. Scouting.
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